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LizaTech 3D Virtual Reality Glasses with Bluetooth Remote Control for iPhone & Android

LizaTech 3D Virtual Reality Glasses with Bluetooth Remote Control for iPhone & Android

$69.99

The LizaTech 3D Virtual Reality Glasses with Bluetooth Remote Control for iPhone & Android uses high quality ABS and 42mm diameter spherical resin lens material without stimulation plastic sheet lowering down the distortion to the minimum when magnifying the images and providing wider view; You will not feel visual fatigue and dizzy even you used for a long period of time!

The T-shaped straps make it adjustable. Its design can also help decrease the pressure around your eyes so you will feel much more comfortable when watching your favorite movie or tv show; Awesome 3D effect; Easy to insert/remove your smartphone into the glasses.

Suitable for people who are nearsighted under -6.00.
Adjustable pupil distance and sight distance (adjustable on pupil distance and object distance) - Optical Axis Sliding Control function: You can slightly adjust the position of the spherical resin lens through moving the button on the top of the LizaTech 3D Virtual Reality Glasses so as to get a better experience when watching movies. You can get a viewing angle of between 70°-80°/FOV

Compatible with most smartphones (Android / iOS) 4.7” - 6.0” screen size; Both sides of the LizaTech 3D Virtual Reality Glasses have inserts designed for the headset/charging cable for your smartphone. (Do not charge while in use!)

Notice:

Do not use this product when the phone is charging.
Do not use when feeling dizzy, or experiencing nausea
Pregnant women, people with hypertension, or kenophobia, please use with caution

Please read this review from a user on how to connect the remote control:

The controller requires 2 AAA batteries.

SELECTING ANDROID OR IOS MODE:

A switch on the side of the controller allows Android or iOS mode to be selected. Note that you should set the switch properly BEFORE pairing the controller. If you fail to do so, you may be required to unpair and pair the controller before it works properly on your device. For example, selecting iOS mode when pairing with an Android device will erroneously cause Android to recognize the controller as a keyboard device, lacking any useful functionality.

POWERING ON:

After putting two fresh AAA batteries inside, the controller can be powered on by pressing the power button. The blue LED will remain lit steadily for three seconds, and then the controller will begin scanning for Bluetooth connections.

PAIRING:

When the controller is in pairing mode, it scans for Bluetooth connections. The blue LED blinks on and off once per second. When the controller finds a Bluetooth connection, the controller will pair, and the light will shut off.

NOTE that in Android mode, if the Bluetooth icon appears as a keyboard instead of a gamepad, you'll want to unpair and pair the device until it appears as a gamepad. Otherwise, you might lose a bit of the available functionality.

WHEN IT'S PAIRED:

To preserve battery life, the controller shuts off automatically when no input has been triggered for a  minute or so.

Pressing the A, B, C, or D buttons, or either trigger, will cause the blue LED to light up for a brief interval. The associated function will execute on the paired device.

Press and hold the @ button, and then press either the A, B, C, or D button to change modes.

Moving the directional knob (joystick) will not cause the blue LED to light up, even when the directional knob functions properly.

POWERING OFF:

The controller is powered off by holding the power button for three seconds. The blue LED will flicker very rapidly for three seconds, and then the controller and LED will shut off.

USING WITH ANDROID:

After putting two fresh AAA batteries inside, I switched the controller to "Android" mode, and turned it on by pressing the power button.

Since the controller was unpaired, it entered Bluetooth scanning mode, designated by the blue power LED flickering slowly for several seconds. I first paired it with my Samsung Galaxy S7, where the controller appeared under the name "VR-PARK" (see the caveat about name "VR-PARK_IOS" in my section "PAIRING"). Under Android Marshmallow, the status showed up as "Connected as input device", with a gamepad icon. Note that when I went into the pairing preferences for this controller, and turned the "Input device" option from "On" to "Off", the controller automatically turned off.

The controller supports four different modes for Android:

Mode A: Hold down the @ button and press button A, which will place the controller into "media player" mode. In this mode: button A (and the top trigger) pauses/unpauses media playback; button B (and the bottom trigger) simulates the Home button; button C increases volume; button D decreases volume; direction up navigates to the previous track; direction down navigates to the next track; and confusingly, direction left fast-forwards and direction right rewinds (note that some applications, like Google "Play Music" don't seem to support rewind/fast-forward.)

Mode B: Hold down the @ button and press button B, which will place the controller into "gamepad" mode. In this mode, you're supposed to hold the controller sideways and use the directional knob with your left hand, and buttons A through D with your right hand. In this orientation: pressing up, down, left, and right on the directional knob will issue joystick movement commands along the X-axis and Y-axis, in an analog fashion corresponding to how far you press the knob; buttons B, D, C, and A (in that order) emulate gamepad buttons "AB/XY" that were originally introduced by the Super Famicom in 1990, and adopted by a significant number of gamepads since then. Android natively supports these key presses in a way that most games and game emulators know how to understand. It's too bad that the BDCA buttons map to ABXY; it probably would have been far less confusing for this controller to just use standard ABXY buttons in the first place.

Note that when using gamepad mode with non-gaming Android apps, such as the Android home screen, the directional knob will move the "selection" cursor from item to item; button A (and the top trigger) will issue a "Page Down" key press; button B (and the bottom trigger) will select or activate the highlighted item; button C does nothing; and button D will issue a "Back" key press.

Of the A, B, C, D, and trigger buttons, this controller supports two being pressed simultaneously. A third button pressed simultaneously will be ignored.

Mode C: Hold down the @ button and press button C, which will place the controller into "VR" mode. As opposed to "gamepad" mode, in VR mode you're supposed to hold the controller normally, with one hand, instead of rotating it 90 degrees like in gamepad mode. This mode is called "VR" mode because it feels more natural when using this controller with a VR headset.

Moving the directional knob will generate DPAD key presses, which most games and game emulators, and even Android desktop, know how to handle. Button A (or the top trigger) generates a gamepad "Y" key press. Button B (or the bottom trigger) will issue a gamepad "B" key press, which in non-game apps, issues a "Back" key press. Button C selects or activates the highlighted item. Button D does nothing, not even generating a key code.

Mode D: Hold down the @ button and press button D, which will place the controller into "mouse" mode. In this mode, a mouse cursor appears on the paired Android device. Moving the directional knob results in the mouse cursor moving accordingly, with the speed determined by how far the directional know is pressed. Button A (and the top trigger) selects or activates the item under the mouse cursor. Button B (and the bottom trigger) will issue a "Back" key press. Button C increases volume; Button D decreases volume.

Also note that if you press and hold Button A (or the top trigger) to long-select the item under the mouse cursor, you can drag and drop items by moving the directional knob while something is grabbed.

USING WITH IOS:

The controller supports three functional modes for iOS:

After unpairing the controller from my Samsung Galaxy S7, I switched the controller to "iOS" mode, and paired it with my iPhone 5S, where the controller appeared under the name "VR-PARK_IOS".

Mode A: Hold down the @ button and press button A, which will place the controller into "media player" mode. In this mode: button A (and the top trigger) pauses/unpauses media playback; button B (and the bottom trigger) simulates the Home button; button C increases volume, or triggers the shutter when the camera app is open; button D decreases volume, or triggers the shutter when the camera app is open; direction up navigates to the previous track; direction down navigates to the next track; and confusingly, direction left fast-forwards and direction right rewinds.

Mode B: Hold down the @ button and press button B, which will place the controller into "iCade gamepad" mode, which generates the following key presses: Button A (and the top trigger) - "u" upon press, "f" upon release; Button B (and the bottom trigger) - "h" upon press, "r" upon release; Button C - "y" upon press, "t" upon release; Button D - "j" upon press, "n" upon release; direction up - "w" upon press, "e" upon release; direction left - "a" upon press, "q" upon release; direction right - "d" upon press, "c" upon release; direction down - "x" upon press, "z" upon release. This is in accordance with iCade style keyboard mappings for gamepads. Note that the directional knob loses analog functionality in this mode.

Mode C: Hold down the @ button and press button C, which will place the controller into "remote" mode. In this mode: button A (and the top trigger) mutes/unmutes volume; button B (and the bottom trigger) simulates the Home button; button C increases volume, or triggers the shutter when the camera app is open; and button D decreases volume, or triggers the shutter when the camera app is open.

Mode D: Holding down the @ button and pressing button D does nothing.

Although the product description notes that iOS mode supports "shutter/game", I was unable to find a single iOS game that worked with this controller in any way whatsoever.

USING WITH WINDOWS:

This controller functions almost identically on Windows as it does on Android.

Mode A: Functions identically to Mode A on Android, except that button B (and the bottom trigger) generates a "browser back" event instead of "Home".

Mode B: Functions identically to Mode B on Android.

Mode C: Functions identically to Mode C on Android, except that the directional knob generates cursor key presses instead of DPAD key presses.

Mode D: Functions identically to Mode D on Android, except that button B generates an "Escape" key press instead of "Back".

USING WITH Mac OS X:

This controller functions almost identically on Mac OS X as it does on Android or iOS, depending upon which switch setting is selected.

When in Android mode, the major difference is that the directional knob does not move the mouse cursor in Mode D, "mouse" mode.


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